Currency and its Value
The Competition of Nations for the Wealth of the World

It’s no surprise that the participants in the global financial business perceive its precarious state. It is more astonishing that nobody can be found willing to distance himself from the daily disseminated concerns about the latest “developments” on the financial markets, and to criticize the circus that plays itself out in elaborate contrast to unemployment and starving Africans. Especially as this circus arises from the antagonism between the various nations in which the free market economy is raging, and gives this antagonism a new impetus.

“Market Economy and Democracy” in Africa
Imperialism’s Ultimate Development Model for its African Creations and the Consequences

America’s call for an intensified “integration into the world market” is aimed at states that have done nothing other than participate in the world market and earn money with all their means. The dark continent with its 700 million potential market participants is involved in global business. In Africa, too, everything revolves around money: on the markets where the population does its business, as well as with the governments that arrange their activities in accordance with a proper budget. And the results of all that are summed up to a gross national product in accordance with all the rules of national accounting, converted into dollars, and divided by the size of the population, so that one knows where one stands with these countries, as far as economics is concerned.

American power and its use

A. The global management of force

1. The special position of America where force is concerned: Intervening in all matters of power in order to decide them
2. The claim on which America stands: A worldwide regime to control the use of political force
3. American means and methods for asserting and securing global superiority
4. Diplomatic superstructure: The United Nations
5. Ideological superstructure: Treating world politics as the administration of justice and morality

“Jobs” — “Globalization” — “Competitiveness” …
Some remarks about the capitalistic relation between Work and Wealth

Everyone needs work — many people don’t find any. You would find yourself in good company if you took that for a social problem, imagining that an “Alliance for Jobs”* would be a suitable solution, with government job-creation measures and a reduction in labor costs, with an abatement of the asset tax and a redistribution of the “scarce good” work by shorter working hours, and the like. All of these “solutions,” though, ignore a certain absurdity: if there is really no longer so much to do, if it really takes fewer people less time to produce necessities — then why does everybody really need work, and especially so many fully crammed working hours, to be able to live? Why doesn’t the equation, less work means spared pains, work out?

From 1917 to Perestroika
The Victory of Morality over Socialism

By Karl Held and Audrey Hill

The Democratic State
Critique of Bourgeois Sovereignty

By Karl Held and Audrey Hill

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